She would consider each day a miracle - which indeed it is, when you consider the number of unexpected things that could happen in each second of our fragile existences.
Veronika decides to die (via themoonlostafaerie)

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worshipgifs:

“…I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.” (John 10:10, ESV)

(Source: worshipgifs)

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smokeybissli:

i don’t understand people who fear living a simple life and remaining unrecognised by the world. i’m happy if i have touched the lives of my parents, siblings and that of the man i will spend my life with and my future children, and there is no shame in leading an unremarkable life and remaining unknown. 

196 notes

You don’t have to be worthy, you only have to be willing.
St. Padre Pio (via acatholicvibe)

(Source: burning-lampstand)

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benpaddon:

The phrase “words to live by” gets thrown around often these days, but these are absolutely words to live by.

(Source: c-mines)

129,593 notes

I was looking for a video of Lee Mead singing “Paint It Black” (from the show “Any Dream Will Do”) but this is MUCH BETTER!

'Close Every Door'
from Joseph and The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

1 note

Humility is the moral virtue that keeps a person from reaching beyond himself. It is the virtue that restrains the unruly desire for personal greatness and leads people to an orderly love of themselves based on a true appreciation of their position with respect to God and their neighbors. Religious humility recognizes one’s total dependence on God; moral humility recognizes one’s creaturely equality with others. Yet humility is not only opposed to pride; it is also opposed to immoderate self-abjection, which would fail to recognize God’s gifts and use them according to his will.
 Fr. John Hardon’s Modern Catholic Dictionary  (via my-scattered-light)

11 notes

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

Yeah, my inner life today is no richer than it was when I worked at Steak ‘n Shake.

I don’t think we should measure the value of a person’s professional life by whether they have esteemed or lucrative work. The best formulation of professional value I’ve come across is from Tim O’Reilly: “Do things that need doing.” 

Stocking shelves? Needs doing. Serving food? Needs doing. Collecting garbage? Needs doing. Editing wikipedia pages? Needs doing. Figuring out how to maximize fees on checking accounts? Doesn’t need doing. Engaging trolls on the Internet? Doesn’t need doing. Volunteering at animal shelters? Needs doing.

Ultimately, for me at least, the measure of work’s value is not expressed best by money or love. The question is whether something that needs to be done is getting done.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

25,080 notes